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Great Meat

Great Meat
Classic Techniques and Award-Winning Recipes for Selecting, Cutting, and Cooking Beef, Lamb, Pork, Poultry, and Game
by Dave Kelly, et al

Fair Winds Press, 2013

This is a consumer's guide to selecting and preparing meats of all kinds, from beef and pork to goat, venison, poultry, rabbit, duck, goose and game birds. It includes detailed instructions for grilling, braising, roasting, broiling, stewing and flash cooking.
Great Meat

Compiled by a master butcher, Dave Kelly, at the meat shop Ruby & White in Bristol, England, this book includes recipes from some of the best restaurants in the West Country of England, like the Manor House Hotel in Moreton-in-Marsh, Martini Ristorante and the Circus Cafe and Restaurant in Bath, The Town House in Bristol, and Bath Priory as well as Keefer's Restaurant in Chicago.

Recipes are grouped into six categories of meats - beef, pork, lamb, game, chicken and turkey, and duck, goose and game birds - along with background information on how the meats are produced and a guide to the available cuts.





The Butcher's Shop by Frans Snyders
The Butcher's Shop by Frans Snyders

Butcher's Shop by Annibale Carracci
Butcher's Shop by Annibale Carracci
 
Hanging Venison

Butchers and abbatoirs hang venison in fully furred condition for between three days and three weeks. This process is crucial to relaxing the tough muscles.

The tenderest meat comes from smaller species and younger animals. A young roe deer may only need a few days aging, while an older fallow or red deer could need up to three weeks to mature before sale.

Fresh venison has a deep purple-red color, with closely packed meat fibers. There is little fat - virtually none on wild venison - but what there is is firm and white. Never buy venison with yellow or flaccid-looking fat. The portioned meat may be  refrigerated for two days if well wrapped and sealed. It can be frozen for one month, vaccuum-sealed in freezer plastic. Venison also dries into the best-tasting jerky strips.

Choosing a Butcher

When you walk into a butchers take a sniff: It will smell of meat, with no off orders. The butcher should be friendly and accommodating, someone who will bone out a chicken or supply bones for stock. But butchery is more than just a trade – it's a skill, a craft, and requires real passion.


For an independent butcher, not governed by the relentless pursuit of the bottom line, the butcher's counter is the heart and soul of the operation. The counter should be full of great stuff, possibly some unfamiliar items, and should make you want to get cooking. Look for cuts on the bone, especially beef. Whole carcasses should be on-site, so any cut should be available; and if not, should be ordered in on request. Once you've got a great butcher, you're guaranteed great meat.


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